10 Weird Foods From Around The World

Adventure , , , ,

Are you adventurous enough to eat just about anything? Think about it…there are some REALLY strange and bizarre foods out there. We don’t but if you have the stomach for it, then try these 10 weird foods from around the world. Bon appetite!

Sannakji, South Korea

Sannakji, South Korea
Fancy food that moves on a plate? This is raw food at its squirming best. Sannakaji, unique to South Korea, is long arm octopus that although is killed, still wriggles. Now that you have a visual of spawning tentacles, this dish requires skill to eat because some arm pieces can latch on to your throat and cause you to choke. No wonder then that this dish seasoned with sesame oil and seeds is usually served as a snack with soju, a potent alcohol brew.

Tuna Eyeball, Japan

Tuna Eyeball, Japan
Do we have your attention? Believe it or not, tuna eyeball is a delicacy in Japan. No guesses for what it actually is! Tuna eyeball is available at most grocery stores and to cook it, just boil it and enjoy it with some seasonings or sauces.

Blodplättar, Sweden

Blodplättar, Sweden
Since when did congealed blood become food? Well, it’s been a while in Sweden with Blodplättar. Similar to English black pudding, this is more of a crispy pancake made with pork blood, milk, rye flour, dark molasses, onion and butter and served with lingonberry jam.

Witchetty Grub, Australia

Witchetty Grub, Australia
Known to feast on the indigenous witchetty bush in Aboriginal Australia, witchetty grub are the larvae of moths. The taste of this high-protein dish has been compared to almonds and crispy chicken skin depending on whether it’s eaten raw or is lightly sautéed.

A-ping, Cambodia

A-ping, Cambodia
Wondering what a-ping is? We bet you weren’t expecting it to be a spider, were you! If that hasn’t got your curious, more specifically, it’s a variety of a tarantula that’s found in Cambodia. Usually eaten as a snack, the spiders are fried in oil with garlic in it and tossed with a mixture of sugar, salt and MSG.

Balut, Philippines

Balut, Philippines
Not all eggs are created equal! Balut, a common street food in the Philippines, is developing chicken or duck embryo eaten from its shell. Supposedly high in protein and calcium, the egg is incubated between 14-21 days before it’s cooked. For those who enjoy balut, it supposedly tastes better seasoned with salt, chili and garlic. Another way to enjoy it is to scramble and serve it with a vinegar dip!

Escargot, France

Escargot, France
In the mood for something slimy? Escargot is a delicacy famous the world over. Similar to the texture of clams and mussels, escargot is usually flavored with garlic and parsley butter. Escargot doesn’t come cheap and features on the menus of the fanciest restaurants in France.

Coral Worms, Samoa

Coral Worms, Samoa
Coral worms are locally known as palola in Samoa. Found in the Polynesian Islands, they can be fried in oil or baked in to a loaf with coconut milk and onions. Most popularly, coral worms are used as a spread on toast.

Casu Marzu, Italy

Casu Marzu, Italy
Italian food to most of us means pizzas and pastas but casa marzu brings an unexpected twist. Literally meaning ‘rotten cheese’, it’s a traditional cheese made out of Sardinian sheep milk and contains live insect larvae, which help in the fermenting process. Casu marzu can be eaten with or without the maggots!

Haggis, Scotland

Haggis, Scotland
A staple in Scotland, haggis is a savory pudding made from a sheep’s lungs, heart and liver and cooked with onions, oatmeal, spices and suet. In keeping with the times, there’s also a vegetarian version of haggis where vegetables, pulses and nuts are substitutes for the non-vegetarian ingredients.

Author: Devika Khosla

With the inability to sit still, she’s always going ‘somewhere’. Foodie, spa junkie, animal lover and traveler. That’s Devika’s story.

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